Welcome to Parent 2.0
A Wiki Resource for Parents and Educators
in a Technology-Enabled World

April 12, 2008
I've posted a research summary and questions in my blog. Please have a look and respondif you can.
Cindy Seibel


March 31, 2008
A friend said the improvement cycle proposed on Literature page assumes that parents and teachers WANT to be involved. I think the research is saying parents want to be involved (if one can extrapolate that every parent wants the best for his/her child) but don't know how, and that teachers aren't hearing the research (although some get it intuitively or through experience) so aren't motivated and also don't know how. There is also a great deal to be learned from the communication research, talking to rather than talking with, that might inform the disconnects.
Cindy Seibel



March 17, 2008
I've been reading Kevin Marjoribanks' 2002 book Family and School Capital: Towards a Context Theory of Student' School Outcomes. Without getting into great detail in this post about all the various elements of each dimension in the theory, I was struck by the magnitude of impact that expectation and aspiration, on behalf of both the parent and the teacher, have on student success according to the research cited by Marjoribanks.
Marjoribanks has several other publications on the issue of parent and student. A more recent work from 2006 Engaging With Parents, Families and Community: The Why and How of Effective and Sustainable Partnerships discusses more pragmatics. As an extension of his work on a context theory, he discusses the need to engage parents "on their own terms".(p.7) Models of parent engagement need to be flexible to respond to the context of that family, school and community. What, in practical terms, does that mean? The suggestion is that it is about inviting parents to participate in a variety of different ways, and providing training/support to do so.
Cindy Seibel


Looks like you're off to a great start with this, Cindy. Don't worry about populating it with a lot of stuff right away. It's like moving into your first house. The first couple of years you wonder why the place feels so empty, and the next thing you know it is full of stuff and you're planning your first garage sale.

Rick Schwier



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